{nl}So how did Suri deal with the eye patch?That would be Suri Cruise and her dad, Tom, who famously wears a black pirate-esque patch in his new film, “Valkyrie”, a World War II thriller about a plot to assassinate Hitler that opened on Christmas. Cruise plays the coup’s real life ringleader, the aristocratic Col. Claus von Stauffenberg. Suri, often touted as the most powerful tot on the planet, would often walk to her dad as he was ready to leave the makeup trailer, and “she would take my eye patch off,” says Cruise with his trademark laugh. “The girls in the makeup trailer got her a stuffed bear with a patch on it so that she would play with that and start to feel very comfortable.”Suri wasn’t the only one disconcerted by the eye patch. The blogosphere went nuts — not in a good way — when images of Cruise in his character’s Nazi gear first appeared online, but perhaps that’s the fate of being Tom Cruise in the last few years. Every action seems to provoke an unanticipated reaction. Holed up in the Beverly Hills Hotel last week, Cruise is in the middle of the “Valkyrie” press tour, which could also be dubbed the “apology” tour, an elaborate jaunt with stops at some of the media outlets (“Today” show, anyone?) that contributed to his famed couch-jumping, Scientology-spouting, psychiatry-bashing media implosion of 2005.In a green sweater and jeans, the 46-year-old Cruise is thin, friendly and solicitous, with practically the only visible sign of age being the little laugh lines around his eyes. He also appears relaxed — one suspects that was helped in part by the presence of his wingmen, director Bryan Singer and Singer’s childhood friend, Academy Award-winning screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie. Unlike many of his peers in stardom, Cruise does not seem to travel with a posse of guy pals, an entourage of buddies from before fame; one can almost imagine him living in a hermetically sealed bubble with wife Katie Holmes, his children Suri, Bella and Connor, his sisters and various Scientologists. But that apparently is not the case.When Cruise is asked if he feels misunderstood, Singer and McQuarrie jump in with the passion of longtime homeboys (well, longtime homies who happen to be intellectual film geeks from Princeton, N.J.). “He’s totally misunderstood. Tom, you need to let us talk about you,” says Singer, passionately, as Cruise looks on vaguely embarrassed. Singer describes the time they all spent with Tom and his family, he and McQuarrie’s circle of family and friends in Germany, and in the desert (where they shot a battle sequence).”You spend the first two weeks waiting for the . . . that you think Tom is to manifest itself. And after a year and half, you realize that is not who he is. . . . He gets a bad rap.””He is a really great guy,” chimes in McQuarrie. “He’s a generous person. He works very hard. He is exceedingly professional. There is no hierarchy of any kind on the set. We would have . . . somebody’s mother came to visit the set and Tom would spend the afternoon having lunch with that person’s mother.”Cruise is more subdued about the vagaries of being Cruise. “I can’t spend my time worrying about it,” he says. As a kid, he moved constantly. “I was always the new kid. I went to different schools and I would hear back rumors about where I came from.”Now it’s the same phenomenon, but “on a world stage, and sometimes it gets even very extreme and you’ve got to laugh about it. And some of it you kind of go, OK. OK, as in breathe, be Zen, ignore what you cannot control.”For those who are not Cruise-ologists, here’s a recap of the various bad news that afflicted the Cruise world in the last few years. Besides the various dents to his image, Paramount severed its longtime relationship with the superstar after the so-called underperformance of “Mission: Impossible 3.” Cruise rebounded by taking over United Artists, but earlier this year his longtime producing partner, Paula Wagner, left amid charges that the duo was not productive enough. Their first film, the political drama “Lions for Lambs,” was perhaps the biggest bomb of his career.Cruise began his image rehab this summer with a hilarious turn as a vulgar studio head in “Tropic Thunder” and received a Golden Globe nomination for his hip-swiveling.Still, the task is not yet complete. A lot rides on “Valkryie,” a $90-million thriller that doesn’t exactly shriek holiday good cheer. (Reviews have been mixed to negative.)The film itself has been dogged with controversy, including the German government’s initial reluctance to let the filmmakers shoot in Berlin’s Benderblock because of Cruise’s practice of Scientology (a policy later rescinded) and changing release dates. And, oh yes, Singer, who’s made such films as “X-Men,” is also coming off ” Superman Returns,” a blockbuster so ill-received that it could have conceivably killed the franchise.One can understand why they were happy to retreat to Berlin to discuss the minutiae of the Nazis for hours on end, make a film about brave men banding together to take down the greatest villain of the 20th century and watch a ton of movies together. “You know we are film geeks,” says Cruise.”And he’s worked with every filmmaker that we would be talking about!” says Singer, recalling how they would grill Cruise for firsthand dope on greats such as Kubrick and Spielberg.Singer says he’s been obsessed with Nazis from a very young age. “I had these two friends that were German, and . . . we had a little Nazi club.” The kids didn’t know what Nazis did exactly, but they were fascinated by the spectacle. One day, Singer, who is Jewish, arrived home with a homemade swastika armband scrawled in crayon. “My mom saw it. She, wow, she exploded at the sink. I will never forget[that]and the lecture.”As kids, McQuarrie and Singer made various 8-millimeter films about Nazis in Singer’s backyard, and once faux-executed a buddy in his basement using a blood pack attached to fireworks.”Nobody got killed during the making of the event,” jokes McQuarrie.And “Valkyrie” isn’t the first feature film Singer has made about a Nazi — he also directed 1998′s “Apt Pupil.”As a kid, Cruise himself had “a German helmet that had blood on it.””It was always how we are going to kill the Nazis and how we are going to kill Hitler,” he said. He also liked to watch WWII documentaries, which left him with a lifelong love of airplanes. (He actually owns a P-47.) “I would look at these images and, of course, I always wondered why didn’t someone just shoot Hitler.” Once he started working on “Valkyrie,” Cruise got what sounds like a personal seminar in Hitler and the Third Reich, led mostly by McQuarrie, who went so far as to actually interview 91-year-old Rochus Misch, Hitler’s last living bodyguard. Cruise refused to go on that fact-finding mission. “I didn’t want to meet him,” says Cruise. “Evil is still evil. I don’t care how old you are.”While Singer and McQuarrie led Cruise into an examination of Nazi Germany, he unwittingly also led them into a study of the circus that follows him.”There was some crazy” stuff, says Singer. Early on, he asked Cruise to come to a coffee shop with him. And he said Cruise told him, ” ‘Yeah, well I can hide. I can lay down in the back of your car. We’ll get out the driveway, maybe the people outside the house won’t follow.’ “”It’s what I call the tail of the comet,” says McQuarrie, recalling a time they went out for pizza with their kids [he has little girls too] in Germany and were peacefully taking a walk when Cruise stopped to help a shopkeeper carry a heavy metal clothing rack from outside her shop in for the night. “As soon as we stopped, the tail catches up to you and you realize that you are being followed by like two dozen people at a distance.””You just have to accept it,” says Cruise, who tries to stay calm, particularly around his kids. “You know you can spend your life living in your single room, but that is not for me. That’s not who I am, my family is or how I want to raise my kids. I don’t want to live that.”{nl}Source:  Rachel Abramowitz, Los Angeles Times

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 27 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}When the door opens and Tom Cruise enters the suite of Seattle’s Hotel 1000, it is with that distinctive whirl of charisma and seductive confidence that has made him the world’s biggest movie star of the past 25 years: killer smile, eyes that bore into you, the firmest of firm handshakes held for a few flattering seconds.{nl}His hair is moussed back, and he’s dressed with casual elegance: jeans, Italian boots, a knit shirt with sleeves pushed up to his elbows. At 46, a few lines crinkle the corners of his famous face as he smiles, but he still looks so boyish he probably could get away with playing the lead in “Risky Business II.”{nl}It’s the first week of November, and he has come to town to publicize his new movie, “Valkyrie” (which opened Thursday). Why so early? “Chris (McQuarrie, the film’s writer-producer) lives in Seattle, and we thought we’d give you guys the first crack at it. This is actually my first interview for the film.”{nl}Even so, and even though the film — in which he plays a German officer who tried to assassinate Hitler — is a huge departure and career gamble, he admits he’s having “a hard time focusing” on what’s going on today because last night Barack Obama was elected president, and “everything else seems insignificant right now.”{nl}”Katie (Holmes, his wife) called me from New York last night, and the cheering on the streets was so loud I could hear it over the phone in her hotel room. It’s amazing! It feels like a turning point in history, doesn’t it? A great, great new beginning for the country after all we’ve been through for the last eight years.”{nl}As we take our seats and reminiscence a moment about his last Seattle visit (to publicize 2002′s “Minority Report”), he acknowledges that he, too, “could use a new beginning.” Despite his marriage and “a lot of joy” in his personal life, the past few years “have been a rough period in many ways.”{nl}Rough, indeed. After two decades of unparalleled popularity, the world seems to have turned on Cruise over the past few years. Think of that uproar over his couch-jumping on Oprah Winfrey’s talk show. Or his being fired from his special relationship with Paramount because of “his behavior” and the poor box office of “Mission Impossible III.”{nl}He’s been constantly under attack for his Scientology beliefs, especially after a clip of him espousing the religion wound up on YouTube, and his stance against psychiatric drugs made him the bad guy in a public conflict with friend Brooke Shields. When he went to Germany to film “Valkyrie,” much the country wanted him to stay away.{nl}Still, he doesn’t see himself as any kind of victim. “I made some mistakes, and I didn’t handle some situations very well. I’ve learned some valuable lessons from all these experiences. Has it made me cynical? Absolutely not. But, yes, it’s made me more cautious. … In the age of the Internet, you have to be more careful.”{nl}Cruise seems willing to discuss these unpleasant matters, but he’s also noticeably uncomfortable with the subject. What he really wants to talk about is “Valkyrie.” He admits he’s nervous about the film and — since I’m one of the first critics to see it — he wants to know what I thought of it.{nl}When I tell him I thought it was pretty terrific — the most nail-bitingly suspenseful movie I’ve seen all year — he makes a fist, shakes it in the air and gives out an enthusiastic “Yessss!” that startles me. For a moment, I think he might jump on the couch, but instead he just beams and says, “Well, that’s music to my ears.”{nl}”Valkyrie” tells the story of Col. Claus Von Stauffenberg, the aristocratic German Army officer who tried to rid his country of the Nazi leadership in a complex plot that included a July 20, 1944, assassination attempt on Hitler by planting a bomb in one of his high-level strategy sessions.{nl}”We’ve tested the movie and have a certain amount of confidence in it. But it’s a challenge to keep an audience in a state of suspense when they basically know the outcome of the story — that, you know, Hitler ultimately didn’t get assassinated. And you never know for sure how a movie is going to play to critics.”{nl}The film is the second Cruise has produced under the United Artists banner since he took over the moribund movie company in 2005. The first, the 2007 anti-Iraq war drama “Lions for Lambs,” bombed badly, but Cruise says its failure didn’t “deter his commitment” to make the new UA synonymous with important, prestige movies.{nl}He admits that when the script of “Valkyrie” came to him, he’d never heard of Von Stauffenberg and didn’t know there had been a significant anti-Nazi German resistance in World War II. “But I love history, and I’ve read a lot about the Third Reich and the drama of the man’s quest just really appealed to me from the start.{nl}”It hit me that Von Stauffenberg was an authentic hero … and that his special kind of heroism was worth examining. Movies, of course, are full of heroes and I’ve played a few of them myself. But, while this action-movie (bravado) is fun, it’s not real. It doesn’t give us an honest portrait of a genuinely heroic life.”{nl}Cruise says he tried to play the character with “no phony courage,” as a man dedicated to “his task … risking everything — including the fate of his wife and children, and the certainty of being branded a traitor to his country — because he knew it was the right thing to do.”{nl}As he elaborates, it’s apparent that he identifies with Von Stauffenberg on some personal level that he can’t quite verbalize. And it strikes me that what he’s saying about the man’s character is very similar to what he wrote in his eulogy for his friend Paul Newman in People magazine shortly after the actor’s death.{nl}When I point this out and the conversation shifts to Newman, something comes over Cruise: His manner relaxes, his face brightens and his eyes tear up. He says, “Paul lived with such dignity and left such a legacy — as an actor and a philanthropist — that words can’t do justice to his accomplishment.”{nl}Growing up, Cruise suffered from dyslexia, felt abused in several ways and later told at least one interviewer his own father was a “bully.” And it’s clear that Newman (“He used to call me ‘Cruiser’ “) was a cherished father figure for him — to the point where he’d be happy to sit here all day and talk about him.{nl}Stardom, he says, is an “unnatural” thing to happen to a human being. Most stars “haven’t handled it well” — and plenty “have been destroyed by it.” But “think of Paul’s life. He had a successful marriage, he did great work and he made the most of the responsibility his (superstar status) gave him to do good things for the world.”{nl}Is it important for Cruise to have a role model? “It is, yes. When things get tough — as they invariably do for everyone — we need to be able to look at another person who’s gone before us and draw inspiration from the way he handled his difficulties. Having someone like this in your life is a gift.”{nl}As his publicist enters the room to signal my time is up, Tom Cruise seems to have a small epiphany.{nl}”Now that I think about it,” he says with a smile, “this idea is probably one of the reasons that made me want to make ‘Valkyrie.’ Like Paul, Von Stauffenberg is a good role model. So I guess you could say that both men have been a gift to me.”{nl}Source: William Arnold, seattlepi.com{nl} 

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 26 December 2008 | Filed under News
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Tom is on the cover subject of the Australian magazine FILM INK. Check back soon.  We’ll be posting the scans shortly.{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 26 December 2008 | Filed under News
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Part 1{nl}{nl} Part 2{nl}{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 26 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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Gorgeous pics of Kate & Suri doing some shopping at The GAP Store yesterday evening have been added to our gallery.  Enjoy them!{nl}Shopping at Gap – December 23rd 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News
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{nl}CLICK HERE TO VISIT VALYKRIE’S OFFICIAL SITE!

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie
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Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}How Tom Cruise is helping the victims of 9/11, including my own family.{nl}I make my living interviewing celebrities, so I’m not the one who usually gets star struck. But recently, I found there is one exception to my rule: Tom Cruise. I’ve interviewed Tom many times and he’s always charming, polite and entertaining. But this time I had an opportunity to speak to Tom not just as a producer, but as a wife and mother. It was a conversation I’ll never forget, an experience I’ll cherish forever and one my entire family will be eternally grateful for.{nl}Back in September, I wrote about my families experience on 9/11. I wrote about the terror of holding my four-month-old baby in my arms and watching from the deck of our home as the 2nd plane crashed into the south tower just a mere mile away from us. I wrote about how my husband, Dave, a news cameraman, was covering the tragedy when the first tower collapsed. He came away with some of the most chilling news footage of that day and nearly lost his life in the process.{nl}We know how lucky we were that Dave walked away that morning when so many others died. But like so many families who had loved ones exposed to the toxic dust and smoke of 9/11 — we realized that the danger didn’t end when the debris was cleared. Rescue workers and people like Dave, who spent months on location covering the tragedy, were exposed to dangerous toxins. Now, years later, so many of these people are suffering from a variety of ailments which are a direct result of breathing in that dangerous air.{nl}That’s where Tom Cruise comes in. Tom is a huge supporter and sponsor of the NY Rescue Worker’s Detox Program. The program offers a free 30-day detox to those affected by 9/11, including most recently — my husband, Dave. We had heard stories about how the detox worked to rid the body of these dangerous chemicals, but didn’t really know what to make of it until the day Dave called to tell me that as he sat in the sauna, the towel draped across his body turned blue, yellow and black — a result of the heavy metals and toxins he had ingested on 9/11.{nl}In the craziest coincidence ever, I was scheduled to interview Tom Cruise the day after Dave finished the detox. As we were chatting before our interview began, I mentioned to Tom that Dave had just completed the program. It didn’t matter that he had dozens of interviews waiting — right then and there, Tom Cruise the superstar took a back seat to Tom Cruise the husband, father and humanitarian. He stayed with me and asked me about Dave — what happened to him, how he was feeling and what he thought of the program. He wanted to know everything. This actor was not acting concerned — he was concerned. Instead of asking him questions about Katie and Suri, I found myself answering Tom’s questions about my own family. {nl}We finally broke away and it was my turn to ask the questions — this time about Tom’s new film, “Valkyrie.” We talked about the film, and he mentioned how he grateful he is for his family — his three wonderful children and his beautiful wife, Katie. As our interview wrapped, Tom Cruise put his arms around me and hugged me. “Thank you.” He said. “Thank you for telling me about your family.” {nl}Back when Tom helped bring the detox to NY several years ago, there were concerns and questions about the program. Now, six years later, over 900 rescue workers have been helped, including my husband. The results and support from the rescue worker community have been astounding.{nl}So many people know Tom Cruise as the movie star, the action hero and the one who always saves the day on the big screen. But it seems Tom doesn’t need a script to save the day. He’s doing it every single day. Through his generosity and concern for those affected by 9/11 — Tom Cruise is an everyday hero to so many families, including my own.{nl}Source:  Mom Logic

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News
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{nl}{nl}”From the start, it was very comfortable,” Singer says. “Here was a person giving me complete trust and respect as an actor, and I know that he’s just worked with Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and Michael Mann — the list goes on. That immediately put me at ease. And ultimately, Tom brings out the best in you.”{nl}”And I think that’s the way you directed me, right from the beginning, with your ideas on the character and the exploration of the character, your generosity as a filmmaker,” Cruise interjects. “When we’re making a movie, I’m an actor. I love acting and I want to be directed. I don’t want to direct myself. And Bryan has an uncanny thing; he knows when it’s right. He knows when things are there.”{nl}By way of example, Cruise singles out one tense scene in which Stauffenberg, having just returned to Berlin after detonating the bomb, phones Olbricht, only to learn of the kinks that have already developed in their can’t-miss plan. “So here we were, working on this scene,” says Cruise. “We tried it a bunch of different ways, and this one time Bryan came in and said, ‘Now, after that line, I want you to hold the phone down. Just say the line and then hold the phone down.’ And I knew exactly that that behavior was perfect. That’s the kind of thing — together, you know we’re going to figure it out. It might seem like a little thing, but that moment — that’s Stauffenberg. That’s someone who’s right there at the edge about to lose control and realizes…he just puts that phone down to gather himself under such tremendous stress. The character was built around these very specific moments.”{nl}The result is a solid performance in exactly the type of role that has long been Cruise’s strong suit: a man of means and determination who, even when thwarted by circumstance (or forced, as in Rain Man, Magnolia and Jerry Maguire, to confront his own shallowness), reliably emerges better, stronger and even more focused than he was before. It’s the archetypical hero’s journey as canonized by Joseph Campbell, and Cruise was born to play it, even if it’s debatable whether or not he was born to play a German officer.{nl}Indeed, Stauffenberg is only Cruise’s third character of foreign extraction, and the previous two (the French bloodsucker Lestat in Interview With the Vampire and the Irish farmer Joseph Donnelly in Far and Away) were emigr

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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Check out our gallery for some tender images of Kate & Suri out and about NYC this morning{nl}Out & About NYC – December 23rd 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 24 December 2008 | Filed under News
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