Below are links to several interesting and insightful interviews with ‘Valkyrie Screenwriter Chris McQuarrie, Director Bryan Singer and Composer John Ottoman.  Enjoy them!!  {nl}Interview with Screenwriter Chris McQuarrie{nl}Interview with Director Bryan Singer{nl}Interview with Composer John Ottoman{nl} 

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 23 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}{nl}“Valkyrie,” Tom Cruise said of his WWII drama, is not a comeback.{nl}For the one-time box-office champ whose “Lions for Lambs” sank like a stone last year, this return to the big screen follows a tumultuous period in which he left his unofficial home studio, Paramount Pictures, married Katie Holmes and generated controversy for his Scientology views.{nl}“I had my daughter. She was born,” he said, referring to now 2-year-old Suri, “and I’ve been making films.”{nl}His fat-suited cameo in ‘Tropic Thunder’ earned him a Golden Globe nomination and now Cruise, 46, plays a German anti-Nazi hero Claus von Stauffenberg, the leader of the audacious July 20, 1944 assassination attempt against Adoph Hitler.{nl}For Cruise, “Valkyrie” – the code name for military operations if Hitler died – was a no-brainer.{nl}{nl}First, there was director Bryan Singer (“X-Men”) – “I’d wanted to work with Bryan since ‘The Usual Suspects’ ” – and a remarkably factual screenplay.{nl}“You know what? When I read the script, I first thought about how incredibly suspenseful this was,” Cruise said in an interview at New York’s Regency Hotel. “When I put the script down, I thought, ‘This can’t be true, this story.’ I’d never heard it before. Really, a great thriller. And Bryan was always very specific about what this film was going to be: A suspense thriller about killing Hitler.”{nl}Cruise grew up like most American kids, “wanting to kill Nazis” from seeing them as bad guys in countless World War II movies. “Valkyrie” details a vast, complex conspiracy – and the film itself generated Internet buzz, location lawsuits in Berlin and several release dates.{nl}“I know there have been a few things written about this film before people have seen it. Just a couple,” Cruise said, then laughed.{nl}But he’s been here before. “So many times in my career, people have said, ‘Well, why are you doing that?’ Even back as early as ‘Top Gun’ or ‘Born on the Fourth of July.’ ”{nl}With “Rain Man,” one of his biggest hits, “We went through four directors and it took two years to make. ‘Interview with a Vampire’ was another one. I’ve always chosen things that I felt would be challenging, but I’ve always wanted to entertain an audience.”{nl}Source:  Stephen Schaefer, Boston Herald

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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We’ve just added pics of Kate and Suri returning to their apartment last night after shopping at J. Crew in the Time Warner Center.  Be sure to check them out!!{nl}Arriving Apartment – December 21st 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News
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Take a look at this little preview of Tom on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’ playing “touch the head”.  Jimmy can make you do the silliest things!  Be sure to tune in tonight and see Tom on Jimmy!  It’s a really fun show!!{nl} {nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News
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PROGRAMMING REMINDER:{nl}Tom will join Jimmy Kimmel on “The Jimmy Kimmel Show” tomorrow night (Monday/Early Tuesday) at 12:05 AM on ABC.  Don’t miss it!!  It’s hilariously funny!! 

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}Tom Cruise has recieved praise for his role as a Nazi assassin in his latest film ‘Valkyrie’ from none other than the grandson of the soldier he is playing in the controversial film reports New York Daily News.Philipp von Schulthess, the soldier’s grandson who also has a small role in the controversial war drama, insists the actor represented his grandfather “wonderfully”. He defended the actor despite criticism from his own family about the film.Cruise plays injured World War II Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, who led a plot to assassinate Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, in the film.The history-making Colonel’s children voiced objections to Cruise playing their father.”Most of them (von Stauffenberg’s children) haven’t seen it. They’re crossing their fingers this turned out well. I think it did, and hope they agree.” Von Schulthess told the New York Daily News. {nl}Source:  Press Trust of India

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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“I try to find movies that I think are going to be challenging to make, but also very entertaining for an audience,” he says by phone from New York, somehow making something so obvious sound earnest. Taken at face value, though, it’s a spotless window into the decision-making process of one of the most successful actor-producers in Hollywood. “I’ve made my courtroom drama with ‘A Few Good Men,’ and I’ve never had a conspiracy-suspense thriller like this. With everything that I’ve done, I’ve wanted to entertain an audience.” {nl}It’s hard to wade through the detritus surrounding Cruise the public figure to get to the guts of his new movie, the World War II thriller “Valkyrie,” but it’s worth the effort. Despite prerelease snarkiness about the actor wearing a Nazi uniform and an eye patch to play Col. Claus von Stauffenberg, who led a German Resistance attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler and overthrow his government, the resulting film is sleek and taut, with a palpable “Whoa, did this really happen?” vibe.{nl}”What blew my mind when I read the script the first time. I put it down and said, ‘This is a great conspiracy thriller.’ Then I thought, ‘Is this true?’ ” Cruise says of the film named for Hitler’s plan to curtail internal uprisings, which was rewritten by the Resistance to turn it against him. Cruise met with co-writer Christopher McQuarrie and director Bryan Singer, last paired on “The Usual Suspects,” “and we looked at the history, and I was saying, ‘Oh my gosh, it’s true!’ I was amazed at how far they got, and Chris’ script – you’re on the edge of your seat just reading it. That’s why I wanted to make it.”{nl}High-profile gamble{nl}The production is the latest high-profile gamble for the nascent studio head – Cruise and producing partner Paula Wagner took over United Artists in 2006 and promptly stumbled with last year’s well-intentioned but commercially disappointing “Lions for Lambs.” “Valkyrie” faced widely reported hurdles, including a serious on-set accident, damaged film that required reshoots and changing release dates. The production also met a different kind of German resistance: Officials, including Baden-W

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}”Risky Business” was 25 years ago, but Tom Cruise still looks boyish. In Seattle for a few hours last month, as part of the media barrage accompanying his new film “Valkyrie” (opening Thursday), he grinned when reminded of the anniversary. (Then again, Cruise tends to grin

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}”I make a lot of different kinds of movies,” Tom Cruise says, “and I’m always looking for something that’s challenging. But I want to entertain an audience.”{nl}Cruise is describing what drew him to his new movie, “Valkyrie,” which opens Thursday. However indirectly, he’s also describing what it means to succeed at having it both ways: art and entertainment, critics and audience, respect and fame.{nl}One definition of stardom might be as the shortest distance between having it both ways. And while Cruise is a very big star, “Valkyrie” puts that stardom to the test and at a peculiar point in his career.{nl}The film’s directed by Bryan Singer, who made the first two “X-Men” movies and “Superman Returns.” It’s no comic-book extravaganza, though. It’s about a real person, Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, who was executed after almost succeeding in assassinating Adolf Hitler in 1944. Germans . . . history . . . failure: Is it any wonder that during an interview Cruise keeps calling the film “a conspiracy thriller”?{nl}Box office isn’t the only potential problem. When it was announced Cruise would play von Stauffenberg, a national hero, there were protests in Germany because of Cruise’s connection to Scientology. His involvement in running United Artists (the distributor of “Valkyrie”) has proven, at best, a distraction. And at 46, Cruise has reached an age where hits are harder to come by.{nl}True, his most recent movie, last summer’s “Tropic Thunder,” did well, and Cruise’s over-the-top performance as studio head Les Grossman earned him a Golden Globe nomination for best supporting actor in a comedy. But it’s not Cruise’s picture; and the one before that, last year’s “Lions for Lambs,” flopped. The most interesting Cruise picture – certainly, the most prominent one – is the ongoing tabloid franchise that is his life with wife Katie Holmes and their daughter, Suri.{nl}Betting against Tom Cruise has rarely been a smart move, though. His movies have earned aggregate grosses of $6.4 billion – and there’s a reason the tabs keep putting him on their covers. It’s not just what he does but also who he is. “There was that point where, that’s it, he saw the trajectory,” Cruise says of von Stauffenberg. He could be speaking of himself and a different kind of trajectory. Until such time as Will Smith or someone even younger overtakes him, Cruise may be the last real Hollywood star.{nl}In his “Biographical Dictionary of Film,” David Thomson likens Cruise to a latter-day Clark Gable: the confidence, the charm, the staying power. A better comparison may come from literature. Think of Cruise as Jay Gatsby, only he’s a Gatsby unlikely to end up face-down in his own swimming pool. The worst that’s happened to Cruise has been jumping on Oprah’s couch and lecturing Matt Lauer about Ritalin.{nl}Continue reading the full article and hear the audio commentary HERE.  {nl}Source:  Mark Feeney, The Boston Globe

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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{nl}It’s make it or break it time for Hollywood’s former top gun, whose high-flying status is riding on Valkyrie…{nl}Tom Cruise knows you’re talking about him.{nl}Whether it’s your opinions about his wife, Katie Holmes, 2 1/2-year-old daughter Suri, or the couch-jumping incident on Oprah (he tells the Star on reflection, “I could have handled things better”), his ears must be endlessly burning.{nl}But Cruise insists he’s used to it. It’s been that way since he was an 11-year-old going to school in Ottawa.{nl}”Being the new kid, you’re constantly … I dealt with the rumours,” says Cruise, looking straight ahead, fumbling his words as he explains what it was like for a kid whose family was always on the move.{nl}”I’d find out years later where people thought I came from, or who you were. You experience that on some level of, `I never said that, how could you think that?’”{nl}Then Cruise became a movie star and favourite tabloid target. “I’ve been dealing with that for 25 years,” he says with a smile.{nl}Cruise, who was in Toronto for two days last week, hopes his brief trip here will have people talking about him anew, but not about his Scientology beliefs or Oprah antics. He’s seeking to generate buzz in connection with Valkyrie, the World War II thriller directed by Bryan Singer (The Usual Suspects) that stars Cruise as Col. Claus von Stauffenberg, a German officer who helped lead a failed plot to assassinated Adolf Hitler in July 1944.{nl}Much is riding on this movie for Cruise, beyond the rumoured $90 million (U.S.) cost of the film. Valkyrie is his second project as co-owner of United Artists. It’s a film that industry watchers say is critical to his continued seat at the high-stakes player’s table in Hollywood.{nl}It’s also Cruise’s chance to redeem himself and prove he’s still got box-office pull after UA’s first movie, the poorly received Robert Redford-directed Lions for Lambs (starring Cruise, Redford and Meryl Streep) barely got out of the gate last year.{nl}Consequently, Cruise can’t be happy Valkyrie was shut out of the Golden Globe nominations, announced two days after he left Toronto. Cruise was, in fact, nominated, but for his comic turn in Ben Stiller’s Tropic Thunder, as foul-mouthed and furry studio boss Les Grossman.{nl}The Valkyrie shoot seemed beset by problems, from reports (since denied by both Cruise and Singer) that German officials were reluctant to let Cruise shoot crucial scenes in Berlin because of his affiliation with the Church of Scientology. Then 11 extras were injured on the set and sued. And the movie’s opening date has been shunted around from last June to February 2009

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 22 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie, Valkyrie Interviews
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