Toronto was the first stop of Valkyrie’s promotional tour. Here you have some pics of Tom’s appearance in Much More Music{nl}Much More Music (Toronto) – December 8th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 9 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Here you have some pics of Tom leaving his apartment before heading to Toronto to be in Much More Music.{nl}Leaving Apartment (NYC)- December 8th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 9 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Here you have a sneak peek of today’s appearance of Tom at the Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos{nl}{nl}{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 9 December 2008 | Filed under News, Valkyrie Interviews
Comments Off

{nl}They’re making a list and checking it twice! Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes did a little holiday shopping on Katie’s day off from the theater

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 9 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Here you have pics of Tom, Katie and Suri shopping at FAO Schwarz yesterday.{nl}Shopping At FAO Schwarz- December 7th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 8 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Tuesday, Dec. 9 at 7pm and Wednesday, Dec. 10 at 1pm ET{nl}Tom Cruise brings tinseltown glamour to CTV when the Oscar®-nominated actor visits etalk to chat about his upcoming movie Valkyrie, in theatres on Dec. 25.{nl}In Valkyrie, Cruise plays Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, a WWII German officer who led a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, and seize power of the military command in order to end the war. Executive Produced by Cruise, and directed by Bryan Singer (HOUSE: MD, Superman Returns), Valkyrie is based on actual events.{nl}Source: CTV

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 6 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie
Comments Off

Pictures of Kate & Suri ar Rockafeller Center where the duo did some shopping and the lighting of the Christmas tree.  {nl}Kate & Suri At Rockerfeller Center – December 5th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 6 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Here you have some pics of Tom attending the Nascar Sprint Cup Series Awards yesterday evening in NYC{nl}Nascar Sprint Cup Series Awards – December 5th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 6 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

Here you have some pics of Tom leaving his apartment in NYC yesterday morning{nl}Leaving Apartment – December 5th 2008{nl}

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 6 December 2008 | Filed under News
Comments Off

I’m a lucky guy.  Not only have I had a chance to see Valkyrie weeks before mere mortals like you will get to see it, I had the good fortune of talking with its director, Bryan Singer.  B-Sin and I chatted about making the film, about working with Tom Cruise, about why people get so bent out of shape about Tom Cruise and about upcoming projects.  Do those upcoming projects involve Men either Super or X?  Read on to find out. {nl}UGO: So I saw the film about 4-5 days ago, and thought it was really terrific. Congratulations. {nl}Bryan Singer: Oh, thank you. {nl}UGO: It’s funny too, because you know, you always hear: “They tried to kill Hitler, and it didn’t work.” But you never really think about that. And watching this I was stunned the whole time. It was really fascinating stuff. It wasn’t just one dude doing this whole thing, it was an entire story. Quite an eye-opening experience. {nl}BS: Yeah, it probably involved 2000 people directly in the resistance. And like in the movie, everything that happened was pretty much how it went down. They actually succeeded in Paris, they locked up every SS without a shot fired. {nl}UGO: It was really incredible also how the bombing itself comes in around 2/3s of the way through the movie. {nl}BS: Yeah about 2/3s. {nl}UGO: And that wasn’t the climax of the film. It just keeps going. The tension keeps getting ramped up. I was amazed that once it doesn’t work the movie wasn’t over. But there’s a whole extra story going on there. {nl}BS: Well, the goal was to try to keep the audience on the edge of their seats even after they think they know what happens. {nl}UGO: I feel like you played with this very well and honestly in the film, and some of these characters were good altruistic people, but to what extent were some of these people just careerist guys, who saw the writing on the wall? They saw the allies coming in, and maybe could give two sh*ts about, you know, The Final Solution. {nl}BS: The character that Tom Wilkinson played in life and in history represents that personality. {nl}UGO: Did you find that the actors playing the different members of the crew of the teams had to decide for themselves where they fit on that line between altruistic and a career? {nl}BS: I think they did their individual research on the history of the characters, and then had conversations with me about the characters. And I think, by and large, the people directly involved in the resistance, surrounding Von Stauffenberg, were quite committed, quite anti-Hitler. Beck, who Terrance Stamp plays, resigned in 1938 in protest of Hitler, but he was too loved by the army for Hitler to wipe out. So he became a confidant to the conspirators. Tresckow, who Kenneth Branagh plays, was vehemently against the murder of the Jews, as was Stauffenberg. In fact one of the conspirators asked Tresckow, ‘Hitler’s gonna be defeated anyway, why go through with this?’ And he said, ‘Every day the Nazi’s murder 16,000 people. Not casualties of war, murders. This has to stop. And it has to be stopped by Germans.’ {nl}UGO: Yes, that was a very powerful part, where he said that they (the allies) have to know that not all Germans are like this. {nl}Do you think that some people will be able to accept that? Or are they just too committed to seeing all Nazis as pure evil? {nl}BS: No, my hope is that the movie’s entertaining enough. Remember people grew up with Hogan’s Heroes. And they loved Colonel Klink, and they loved Schultz. And they loved the fact of that relationship. And they didn’t want to see anything bad happen to them when the SS came. But no, nobody wants to believe that all of a people are indoctrinated into evil, into murder and such hate. Nobody wants to believe that…sociopaths possibly, but not normal people. So I think it’ll be inspiring to people. I hope it will be. {nl}UGO: The look of the film is absolutely fantastic. I thought, visually, it was just remarkable.  Hats off.  To you and your team and to Albert Speer, I suppose. {nl}BS: Well, to step away, when I started to look at the color photography from the Second World War – and there’s a lot of it, a lot more than people realize – you started to see things, like in Hitler’s home, a lot of kitsch. There were a lot of throwbacks in things; in the reds of the uniforms from the First World War. There was a lot of dimension going on, a colorful dimension that we don’t always see in movies of this subject matter. Movies about Nazis often just rely on the fascist architecture. {nl}UGO: It’s funny you mention the red specifically, because the tribunal scene at the end, when they’re wearing those red uniforms, was that true? {nl}BS: Sure, I can show you the film. Those trials were actually filmed. Unfortunately it was in black and white, but that’s what they wore. They looked exactly like that. And he was exactly like that. They were humiliated and then taken out and executed. With piano wire, on Hitler’s direct order. {nl}UGO: Yeah, that was particularly gruesome. It was almost hard to watch. Was there really a giant swimming pool with swastika tiles like that? {nl}BS: There were things so much more grand, and permanent, like that in the Reich. Remember, the Reich was designed by the Nazis to last a thousand years. They built monuments, they built murals. And as I was touring a place, I found a tile mural of a swastika on the ceiling that hadn’t been removed. And that’s illegal in Germany, you’re not allowed to display things like that unless you have permit. So I saw this in this dank military installation that we were visiting. And I thought of most of those huge Nazi artifacts and monuments to Hitler and Nazism and how they were destroyed and blown up and chipped away. So yes, I put the swastika tile at the bottom of that pool. But, that represents things that went far beyond that. {nl}UGO: You mentioned some of the specific rules that exist in Germany. And this brings up a big story while you were in production, with Tom Cruise and his religion and shooting there. There were a lot of rumors floating around… {nl}BS: And that’s all it was, just rumors. Someone reported that someone said something about that and no one knows who or what, or what was really said or implied. And then it became a tabloid item that suddenly became a news item. And it was astonishing to us. It was very annoying. But ultimately we shot in that location, and we went back there twice. {nl}UGO: You know, when you work with Tom Cruise you get two things, you get usually a phenomenal performance, and in this case I think he pulled out another one, but you also always get the chattering classes. And I’m wondering if that affected you on any personal level while you were in production or post-production. How does that affect your decision-making when you’re doing a film and you see the guy who you’re working with is always major news. {nl}BS: You know, the first thing I do, because I know him so well, is I don’t blame him. I experienced some of this in a different way from fans when I was ramping up to make X-Men; skepticism, cynicism. And I kept thinking, ‘You know, I thought these same fans really liked The Usual Suspects,’ do they really think I’m going to fu*k this up so bad? But the skepticism was so bad. They came at me about the costumes and worrying if I’ve read all the comic books. So, naturally, this was just a different kind of that noise. It wasn’t new to me. But we were really focused on making the movie, and Tom never waivered in his energy and his grace under that kind of pressure. A lot like Stauffenberg, I must say. {nl}So I was somewhat stressed about this during the filming, but it was nothing compared to the stress of being Jewish and shooting this movie in Berlin. The last thing I’m thinking about is what Page Six was saying, when my apartment was next to the plaza where they burned the books. {nl}And, with the exception of Magnolia, this was the first time he’d worked with a director young than him. So for him to afford me that kind of trust, with all this scrutiny, was great. He’s Tom Cruise, though. He sells magazines. And people take advantage of that. {nl}UGO: So on a arc of these historical characters, if we think about Beck as pure good, and Tom Wilkenson’s Fromm as pure self-interest, would Stauffenberg have done what he’d done if he weren’t injured? {nl}BS: Well, if he hadn’t been injured, he wouldn’t have had the access to do what he did. So he wouldn’t have been able to. It was the injury that brought him back to the War Ministry, where he used to work, and it was this opportunity that brought him close to Hitler. But he was quite outspoken throughout the war. And it got him in some trouble. And I think he would’ve continued to do that. {nl}UGO: And he was enough of a patrician that they couldn’t really throw him in the clink for that? {nl}BS: Yeah, but I think, eventually, they could have. Or he could’ve just been purged at the end of the war, like Hitler did with so many. But he couldn’t afford to do it in the middle of the war, because he needed every man he could get. {nl}UGO: What were some of the recent WWII films that you saw that were influential? {nl}BS: I can’t really talk about influence, because that would just be the documentary footage. It’s just that footage, not really a movie. {nl}UGO: Well, from my point of view, if you’re interested, there was so much new information, and I saw a side of the Third Reich that I’d never seen before, so this film is really in a class with Downfall for me. {nl}BS: Photographically it was important too. A lot of times in these WW2 photographs they try to muddy the image to try and make a black and white experience, without having to make a black and white movie. And here, it was important to do the opposite, to bring in the colors and images that people would’ve actually experienced. {nl}UGO: Bryan, I have to ask you…The Man of Steel…Superman… {nl}BS: I wish I had an answer. {nl}UGO: I’m strapping you to a lie detector right now. Do you feel that thing on your arm? {nl}BS: Yeah. {nl}UGO: That’s me strapping you to a lie detector. Tell me something about you and Super Man, and your relationship with each other. {nl}BS: I love Superman, and I cannot tell you anything else. {nl}UGO: Would you like to tell me something else, but you simply can’t? {nl}BS: I can’t…no, no…yeah, I wish I could. But there’s nothing I can say. I’ve got a world press tour for Valkyrie, a premier in New York… {nl}Source: UGO

Posted by Tom Cruise Forever Staff on 6 December 2008 | Filed under News, Press Valkyrie
Comments Off
Page 211 of 262« First...102030...209210211212213...220230240...Last »